UC Connect: Freshwater: new horizons and fresh challenges

Actions and Detail Panel

Sold Out

Event Information

Share this event

Date and time

Location

Location

C1 lecture theatre in C-Block

University of Canterbury

Christchurch, Canterbury 8051

New Zealand

View Map

Event description
Associate Professor Te Maire Tau, joined by Hon Christopher Finlayson QC will discuss the importance of freshwater politically & culturally

About this event

In this upcoming public talk, Associate Professor Te Maire Tau will discuss the importance of freshwater as a taonga of Ngāi Tahu, and examine the way governments have regulated this crucial natural resource over the past 150 years.

He will cover recent developments in environmental and resource management reform and look at how freshwater might be regulated in the future.

Associate Professor Tau will be joined by former Attorney-General, the Hon Chris Finlayson QC, who has recently published a book about Treaty settlements and the Crown-Māori Relationship. The presenters will also explore the ever-evolving Treaty relationship between the Crown and Māori, as we approach New Zealand's bicentenary in 2040.

Dr Te Maire Tau became the Director of Kā Waimaero | the Ngāi Tahu Research Centre at Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha | the University of Canterbury in 2011, having previously been a Senior Lecturer in History at the University. Associate Professor Tau belongs to Ngāi Tahu, principal tribe of the South Island, and lives in Tuahiwi, the largest village of that tribe. Associate Professor Tau is the Ūpoko (Director) of Ngāi Tūāhuriri, the tribal group of the Tuahiwi region in Canterbury. Te Maire is the Co-Chair of Ngāi Tahu’s Freshwater Governance Group: Te Kura Taka Pini.

During his years as an undergraduate and later as a postgraduate student at UC, Associate Professor Tau helped iwi leaders with their land claim to the Waitangi Tribunal, with a particular emphasis on traditional food-gathering practices. As a specialist historian on oral traditions, tribal genealogies and indigenous knowledge systems, Associate Professor Tau was an expert witness and historian for the settlement of the Ngāi Tahu Claim – the largest settlement at the time between Māori and the Crown for lands wrongfully taken. Since then he has had a number of publications dealing with oral traditions and the relationship between indigenous knowledge systems and how they intersect with western science. Associate Professor Tau’s research interests include the philosophy of knowledge, oral traditions, myth, indigenous development, and history.

Christopher Finlayson was born and educated in Wellington. After graduating with a BA in Latin and a LLM, he practised law in Wellington as a solicitor before going to the Bar in 2002. Elected to Parliament in 2005, he became Attorney-General and Minister for Treaty of Waitangi Negotiations in 2008. He held those positions until October 2017. During his Ministerial career he also held several other portfolios. He was chair of the Privileges Committee of Parliament from 2011-2017. Finlayson retired from Parliament on 30 January 2019 to return to the Bar.

Finlayson has served on a number of professional bodies including: the New Zealand Council for Legal Education; the Rules Committee of the High Court; the New Zealand Council of Law Reporting; and a number of New Zealand Law Society committees. Over his career, he has appeared in all the courts of New Zealand in public and commercial law cases. Examples of commercial cases are cases involving the Commerce Act, copyright, contract interpretation and many others. Prior to entering Parliament in 2005 his last case involved acting for the Sisters of Mercy in an historic abuse case where he was successful in both the High Court and Court of Appeal.

In 2013 he represented New Zealand in the International Court of Justice in a case where Australia sued Japan seeking to stop commercial whaling in the Southern Oceans. New Zealand intervened and Mr Finlayson led the case for New Zealand.

• UC Connect public lecture – Freshwater: new horizons and fresh challenges, Presented Associate Professor Te Maire Tau, www.canterbury.ac.nz/ntrc/ University of Canterbury and Hon Chris Finlayson QC, from 7pm – 8pm, Wednesday 29 September 2021 – C1 lecture theatre in Central Lecture Theatres, Ilam campus, University of Canterbury.

Register free to attend: https://www.canterbury.ac.nz/public-lectures/

For further information or to request an interview, please contact:

UC Communications team, media@canterbury.ac.nz, Ph: (03) 369 3631 or 027 503 0168

Share with friends

Date and time

Location

C1 lecture theatre in C-Block

University of Canterbury

Christchurch, Canterbury 8051

New Zealand

View Map

Organiser UC Events

Organiser of UC Connect: Freshwater: new horizons and fresh challenges

Founded in 1873, in Ōtautahi Christchurch, the University of Canterbury | Te Whare Wānanga o Waitaha (UC) has an international reputation for academic excellence in teaching and research.

People come first at the University of Canterbury, reflecting our intrinsic values: whanaungatanga, manaakitanga and tiakitanga. These values are rooted in trust, care and reciprocity, and were embedded over generations of Ngāi Tūāhuriri and Ngāi Tahu presence in the region. In fact, in 1861 Pita Te Hori, the first Upoko of Ngāi Tūāhuriri, instructed the founders of Ōtautahi: “kia atawhai ki te iwi – be kind to your people.” Today, these words underpin the relationships we foster amongst our students, staff and community. We are proud to open our doors to students and staff throughout Aotearoa New Zealand and the world, welcoming everyone to learn from one another and contribute to our diverse and flourishing community. The University of Canterbury is a place for everyone.

The university has an undivided focus on people, research, education and engagement to carry us forward to our 150th anniversary and beyond.

UC offers a unique, world-class learning experience that gives UC graduates a competitive edge in an increasingly challenging, dynamic and complex world – UC students graduate with the skills, knowledge and confidence they need to make a difference.

The University’s research-active lecturers and academics are committed to deploying their expertise and knowledge, and are active in partnering with others to advance civic purpose and foster public good.

Save This Event

Event Saved