Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust, established in 2004 by singer Dame Hinewehi Mohi, enables wellbeing, empowerment and joy through music therapy, using music to promote the healing and personal growth of people with identified intellectual, physical, social or mental health challenges. Our mission is to offer a quality, accessible music therapy service to all people, whatever their needs. Our vision is to enrich and develop lives through music.

Now in our 18th year, we continue to operate New Zealand’s only music therapy centres. Services are managed and delivered through the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre in Grafton. As demand for music therapy services has grown, the Trust has expanded across Auckland and currently operates six satellites in the region as well as delivering outreach programmes in partnership with over 35 schools and organisations nationally, allowing children and adults to receive music therapy directly in their classrooms, group homes, hospital rooms and rehabilitation units. These outreach programmes are run in collaboration with organisations such as Starship, Central Auckland Specialist School, Mason Clinic Regional Forensic Psychiatric Service and The Selwyn Foundation. In June 2018, we launched our first Regional Centre in Hawke’s Bay, followed by the opening of the Northland Regional Centre in March 2019. A third Regional Centre, this time serving the Bay of Plenty, will open in early 2022.

We work with approximately 700 clients per week, ranging in age from infants to those in their 90s. Our clients have a range of special needs, including cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder, Down syndrome, complex medical conditions, traumatic brain injuries, mental health disorders, dementia, exposure to family violence and neglect, and poor community engagement due to socioeconomic challenges. Due to their physical, cognitive and behavioural challenges, the vast majority of our clients cannot participate in community activities such as sport, music lessons, drama and art. Music therapy provides them with the chance to express themselves, develop independence, engage with their community, and develop meaningful relationships. Furthermore, the benefits of the work we do positively impact our clients’ whānau and the wider communities in which they live.

The Raukatauri Music Therapy Trust, established in 2004 by singer Dame Hinewehi Mohi, enables wellbeing, empowerment and joy through music therapy, using music to promote the healing and personal growth of people with identified intellectual, physical, social or mental health challenges. Our mission is to offer a quality, accessible music therapy service to all people, whatever their needs. Our vision is to enrich and develop lives through music.

Now in our 18th year, we continue to operate New Zealand’s only music therapy centres. Services are managed and delivered through the Raukatauri Music Therapy Centre in Grafton. As demand for music therapy services has grown, the Trust has expanded across Auckland and currently operates six satellites in the region as well as delivering outreach programmes in partnership with over 35 schools and organisations nationally, allowing children and adults to receive music therapy directly in their classrooms, group homes, hospital rooms and rehabilitation units. These outreach programmes are run in collaboration with organisations such as Starship, Central Auckland Specialist School, Mason Clinic Regional Forensic Psychiatric Service and The Selwyn Foundation. In June 2018, we launched our first Regional Centre in Hawke’s Bay, followed by the opening of the Northland Regional Centre in March 2019. A third Regional Centre, this time serving the Bay of Plenty, will open in early 2022.

We work with approximately 700 clients per week, ranging in age from infants to those in their 90s. Our clients have a range of special needs, including cerebral palsy, autism spectrum disorder, Down syndrome, complex medical conditions, traumatic brain injuries, mental health disorders, dementia, exposure to family violence and neglect, and poor community engagement due to socioeconomic challenges. Due to their physical, cognitive and behavioural challenges, the vast majority of our clients cannot participate in community activities such as sport, music lessons, drama and art. Music therapy provides them with the chance to express themselves, develop independence, engage with their community, and develop meaningful relationships. Furthermore, the benefits of the work we do positively impact our clients’ whānau and the wider communities in which they live.

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